China's Muslims celebrate Ramadan fast-breaking

Source: Xinhua [08:31 September 22 2009]

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Muslims attend a prayer at Hantengri Mosque in Urumqi, capital of northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Sept. 21, 2009. Millions of Muslims across China celebrated Eid al-Fitr Monday, the festival that signaled the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan -- a season of fasting and spiritual reflection.
Muslims attend a prayer at Hantengri Mosque in Urumqi, capital of northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Sept. 21, 2009. Millions of Muslims across China celebrated Eid al-Fitr Monday, the festival that signaled the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan -- a season of fasting and spiritual reflection.

Millions of Muslims across China Monday celebrated Eid al-Fitr, the festival signaling the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan -- a season of fasting and spiritual reflection.

Early Monday, Muslims of different ethnic groups in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region and Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region and other Muslim-populated areas donned festive costumes and swarmed into mosques to hear imams preach.

After attending morning prayer, thousands of Muslims of Uygur ethnic group in the Xinjiang regional capital of Urumqi went to a large square of the International Grand Bazaar to sing and dance in joy.

"Ramadan is the most auspicious and noblest month of a year. Nomatter how busy I am, I will join in the celebrations," 32-year-old Aziz said.

Business boomed a few days earlier at bazaars in different cities in Xinjiang, especially in Urumqi, which is still recovering from July's riot that left 197 people dead and more than 1,700 others injured.

"Today I can earn more than double normal days," said restaurateur Maiwutigang. "Nowadays, people's lives are better than in the past, and they do not want to involve themselves in tiring cooking, so many of them would rather come to restaurants for a big dinner and celebration."

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